Installing Git, NodeJS, Grunt And PHP For My Impact Game Starter Kits

Installing Git, NodeJS, Grunt And PHP For My Impact Game Starter Kits

A few months ago I created a new section on this site dedicated to my game starter kits. These kits represent games I’ve been working on throughout the year for One Game A Month. Each starter kit handles a specific type of game. The Super Resident Raver starter kit is a side scrolling zombie shooter. The Super Jetroid starter kit is a space theme adventure game. And the final one, Super Paper Monster Smasher is a simple beat-um-up. Together these kits allow you to quickly build out HTML5 games assuming you have a license of Impact which costs $100. The one thing that may be new for people who have never used any of my starter kits before is their dependency on NodeJS and Grunt. So I wanted to share the following videos that not only walk you through how to set up Git, Node, Grunt, PHP and ImpactJS on Windows but also how to configure everything in the starter kit so you can build your own games with them. As you can see from these videos it’s very easy to get these starter kits up and running and the advantages of using a build system like Grunt is...
How To Make A Game Part 5: Publishing and Marketing Your Game

How To Make A Game Part 5: Publishing and Marketing Your Game

So you have finally finished your game and are ready to release it to the world. While there is a lot you can do after you have completed your game to help make it a success, you should always be thinking about marketing your game from the very beginning. The following section will help you with everything from naming your game to how to help it stick out in an overcrowded mobile store. While marketing a game is not an exact science, and its success has a lot to do with the quality of your game and pure luck, you can still take the necessary steps to ensure it gets the most attention possible out of the gate. Free Guide To Making Games Like this post but want to get the entire guid as a PDF? Simply sign up for my mailing list and also get access to great tips and advice on how to make better games. I promise to not spam your inbox! Join The Mailing List Naming Your Game The name of your game is going to be the single most important decision you make. Companies spend huge amounts of money doing market research to come up with product names, and what you come up with for your game has lasting effects. The most basic thing you can do to help your game be more successful is to simply give it a descriptive name. Look at other games and how they came up with their names: “Mario” – Named after the main character. While it doesn’t describe what you will be doing in the game, it...
How To Make A Game Part 4: Polishing Your Game

How To Make A Game Part 4: Polishing Your Game

Once you have your game up and running, and you begin to approach being able to release it, you are going to want to go over all the details and make sure it’s polished. Sure, you can put a game out there just to see how it does, but in today’s saturated market of mobile games, you need to make sure you put your best foot forward when releasing your game. Here are a few things you should do in your own game before you release it. Free Guide To Making Games Like this post but want to get the entire guid as a PDF? Simply sign up for my mailing list and also get access to great tips and advice on how to make better games. I promise to not spam your inbox! Join The Mailing List Consistent Design One of the most important things you should do in your game is make sure your art style is consistent throughout the game. Your in-game graphics and your UI, and even the splash screen, should all look and feel like they belong together. The best example I have of this is Mega Man 2. As you can see the box art for “Mega Man 2”, on the left, is completely different than what the actual game looked like, on the right. While there is a time and place for being creative with your game’s art style, just make sure you don’t set the wrong expectations for your perspective players. This is especially important when it comes to creating screen shots to entice people to pay for or download your...
How To Make A Game Part 3: Creating Artwork and Sounds

How To Make A Game Part 3: Creating Artwork and Sounds

If you don’t come from an art or music background, you might find this part of the game creation process the most stressful. Building a game for the first time will stretch all of your skills, like programming, creativity, design, and more. It’s easy to get bogged down in the details and forget the most valuable part of making a game, which is building something fun to play. In this section, I will talk about some approaches to adding artwork and sounds into your game. Free Guide To Making Games Like this post but want to get the entire guid as a PDF? Simply sign up for my mailing list and also get access to great tips and advice on how to make better games. I promise to not spam your inbox! Join The Mailing List Working Without Art and Sound The first thing I tell people just starting out is to use placeholder art and sound while building a game. It may be hard to believe, but you can always get artwork later, and sound is just as easy to find online or get help making. To be honest, if you build a compelling enough game, you may even be able to convince an artist or musician to work for you and share the profit from the game. But none of that will happen if you don’t have a fun game to begin with. It also helps to take a look at other games that use minimalistic or dynamically generated art as inspiration as well. The following are a few very successful indie games that do that. “Thomas...
How To Make A Game Part 2: Game Design 101

How To Make A Game Part 2: Game Design 101

For most people, it usually starts the same exact way. You have a game idea and just want to start building. Making a game is more than just having a good idea and the skill to code it; you have to think through the gameplay and the target audience, and map out what it is you are going to build. No one builds a house without a blueprint, and you shouldn’t make a game without a solid plan either. This could be something as simple as a task list with everything you need to do or something more specific, such as a document outlining all the details. Either way, your game design process is going to start with a blank page. Let’s talk about how to fill it in. Free Guide To Making Games Like this post but want to get the entire guid as a PDF? Simply sign up for my mailing list and also get access to great tips and advice on how to make better games. I promise to not spam your inbox! Join The Mailing List Play More Games Before we talk about your game, you need to start playing games … a lot of games. As a game maker, your hobby should be playing games, taking them apart, and figuring out what makes them tick. You should keep a notebook of all the games that you play, and even the ones you don’t play but see online. Use something like OneNote, or any note taking app. The idea is to write down what you like about the game, what you don’t like, and some...
How To Make A Game Part 1: Picking a Framework

How To Make A Game Part 1: Picking a Framework

Whether you are a seasoned game developer or just getting started making your own game, chances are you are going to need a good game framework to build upon. A game framework could be as simple as a collection of code packed up into a library in a specific language, like JavaScript, or a more complex system of scripts, tools, and workflow built on a specific platform. Both types are designed to help speed up your game’s development. The last thing you want to be doing, especially when getting started, is reinventing the wheel. Free Guide To Making Games Like this post but want to get the entire guid as a PDF? Simply sign up for my mailing list and also get access to great tips and advice on how to make better games. I promise to not spam your inbox! Join The Mailing List Here is a quick rundown of things to look for in a good game framework: Speeds up development by including collision and physics, and handles input Has good documentation and an active community to help answer questions Is easy to pick up and matches your skill level (drag and drop for non-coders and low-level access for seasoned developers) Easy multi-platform distribution, allowing you to get your new game on as many platforms as possible To help you pick the right game framework, I have highlighted a few of the most popular ones which are great for people getting started making their first game. I have arranged these from easy to hard based on the above criteria. Construct 2 (Beginner) https://www.scirra.com/ Construct 2 is as...

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