How To Make A Game Part 4: Polishing Your Game

Once you have your game up and running, and you begin to approach being able to release it, you are going to want to go over all the details and make sure it’s polished. Sure, you can put a game out there just to see how it does, but in today’s saturated market of mobile games, you need to make sure you put your best foot forward when releasing your game. Here are a few things you should do in your own game before you release it.

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Consistent Design

One of the most important things you should do in your game is make sure your art style is consistent throughout the game. Your in-game graphics and your UI, and even the splash screen, should all look and feel like they belong together. The best example I have of this is Mega Man 2.

As you can see the box art for “Mega Man 2”, on the left, is completely different than what the actual game looked like, on the right. While there is a time and place for being creative with your game’s art style, just make sure you don’t set the wrong expectations for your perspective players. This is especially important when it comes to creating screen shots to entice people to pay for or download your game. In the end, keeping everything consistent will help make the overall game feel more polished.

Supporting Multiple Resolutions

How to support multiple resolutions is probably one of the most common questions I get asked at all of my game design talks. Outside of supporting mobile resolutions, which are all over the place, desktop monitors have been driving game developers crazy for years. When it comes to designing for multiple resolutions, you just need to understand how aspect ratio works and decide whether your game will attempt to maintain it. To help myself out, I always start with a comp of the three main resolutions I want to support.

Here you can see that the native resolution of my game is 800 X 600. This is a 5:3 aspect ratio. From there, I can easily scale my game to 1024 X 768, which is a similar aspect ratio of 4:3. My game will also support 1366 X 768, which is a 16:9 aspect ratio. The key to this system is that my game camera simply shows more of the game screen as I change aspect ratios, and the UI moves based on the resolution as well. Here is an example of the game at two different resolutions.

Here is the game at 800 X 768. As you can see, the camera shows less of the action, but I make sure the UI scales down nicely to support the lower resolution without any overlapping.

And here is the game at 1366 X 768. As you can see, both versions of the game are fully playable, but you end up with a little extra screen real estate at the higher aspect ratio.

Perceived Performance Optimizations

The last thing I want to talk about when polishing your game is perceived performance. A lot of the time, developers spend days upon days trying to optimize their code when they end up forgetting that a few minor tweaks to the way their game runs will help give the impression of better performance to players. Sure, optimizing artwork is a key part of any performance optimization, but why not make your loading screen look more interesting while people wait, or work on making the transitions from screen to screen more seamless. Even tricks like lowering the FPS could actually help out if your game is struggling to maintain 60 FPS. Most games can easily get away with 30 FPS. Also, having more animation transitions and frames can help remove the feeling of slowness or unresponsiveness in gameplay.

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